Pekin Bantam Club of Great Britain

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Breed Satandard

Origin: AsiaClassification: True BantamEgg Colour: White or cream

This is a genuine bantam breed, very old and having no real relationship to the large breed of Cochins. It was imported from Pekin in the middle of the nineteenth century, hence its name. In recent years new colours have been added to the standard.

General characteristics:Male:Type: Body short and broad. Back short, increasing in breadth to the saddle, which should be very full, rising well from between the shoulders and furnished with long soft feathers. Breast deep and full. Wings short, tightly tucked up, the ends hidden by saddle hackle. Tail very short and full, soft and without hard quill feathers, with abundant converts almost hiding main tail feathers, the whole forming one unbroken duplex curve with back and saddle. General type: tail should be carried higher than the head – ‘tilt’.

Head: Skull small and fine. Beak rather short, stout, slightly curved. Eyes large and bright. Comb single, small, firm, perfectly straight and erect, well serrated, curved from front to back. Face smooth and fine, ear-lobes smooth and fine, preferably nearly as long as the wattles, which are long, ample, smooth and rounded.

Neck: Short, carried forward with abundant long hackle reaching well down the back.

Legs and feet: Legs short and well apart. Stout thighs hidden by plentiful fluff. Hocks completed covered with soft feathers curling round the joints (stiff feathers forming ‘vulture hocks’ are objectionable but not disqualification). Shanks short and thick, abundantly covered with soft outstanding feathers. Toes, four, strong and straight, the middle and outer toes plentifully covered with soft feathers to their tips.

Plumage: Very abundant, long and wide, quite soft with very full fluff.

Female:Type: With the exception of the back (rising into a very full and rounded cushion) the general characteristics are similar to those of the male, allowing for the natural sexual differences. 


Colour Standards

The Black:Male and female plumage: Rich sound black with lustrous beetle-green sheen throughout, free of white or coloured feathers (Note: some light undercolour in adult males is permissible as long as it does not show through).

The Blue:Male and female plumage: A rich pale blue (Pigeon blue preferred) free from lacing, but with rich dark blue hackles, back and tail in male.

The Buff:Male and female plumage: Sound buff, of a perfectly even shade throughout, quite sound to roots of feathers, and free from black, white or bronze feathers. The exact shade of buff is not material so long as it is level throughout and free from shaftiness, mealiness or lacing. (Note: A pale ‘lemon buff’ is usually preferred in the show-pen).

The Cuckoo:Male and female plumage: Evenly banded with dark slate on light French grey ground colour.

The Mottled:Male and female plumage: Evenly mottled with white at the tip of each feather on a rich black with beetle-green sheen.

The Barred:Male and female plumage: Each feather barred across with black bars, having a beetle-green sheen on a white background. The barring to be equal proportions of black and white. The colours to be sharply defined and not blurred or shaded off. Barring should continue through the shaft and into the underfluff, and each feather must finish with a black tip. Plumage should present a bluish, steely appearance free from brassiness and of a uniform shade throughout.

The Columbian:Male and female plumage: Pearl-white with black markings. Head and neck white with dense black stripe down middle of each feather, free from black edgings or black tips. Saddle pearl-white. Tail feathers and tail converts glossy green-black, the coverts laced or not with white. Primaries black, or black edged with white; secondaries black on inner edge, white outer. Remainder of plumage entirely white, of pearl-grey shade, free from ticking. Undercolour either slate, blue-white or white.

The Lavender:Male and female plumage:The lavender is not a lighter shade of the blue Pekin. It is different genetically and is of a lighter more silver tint without the darker shade associated with the normal blue. The silver tint is most obvious in the neck and saddle hackle feathers of the male.

The Partridge:Male plumage: Head dark orange-red, neck hackle bright orange or golden-red, becoming lighter towards the shoulders and preferably shading off as near lemon colour as possible, each feather distinctly striped down the middle with black, and free from shaftiness, black tipping or black fringe. Saddle hackle to resemble neck hackle as nearly as possible, Breast, thighs, underparts, tail, coverts, wing butts and foot feather, hock feather and fluff lustrous green-black, free from grey, rust or white. Back, shoulder coverts and wing bow rich crimson. Primaries black, free from white or grizzle, secondaries black inner web, bay outer, showing a distinct wing bay when closed.Female plumage: Head and neck hackle light gold or straw, each feather distinctly striped down middle with black. Remainder clear light partridge brown, finely and evenly pencilled all over with concentric rings of dark shade (preferably glossy green-black). The whole of uniform shade and marking, and the ground colour of the soft brown shade frequently described as the colour of a dead oak leaf, with three concentric rings of pencilling or more over as much of the plumage as possible.

The White:Male and female plumage: Pure snow-white, free from cream or yellow tinge, or black splashes or peppering.

The Birchen:Male plumage:Hackle, back, saddle, shoulder coverts and wing bows silver white, the neck hackle with narrow black striping. Remainder rich black, the breast having a narrow silver margin around each feather, giving it a regular laced appearance gradually diminishing to perfect black thighs.Female plumage:Hackle similar to that of the male. Remainder rich black, the breast very delicately laced as in the male.

The Silver Partridge:Male Plumage:Head silver-white, neck hackle silver-white, each feather distinctly striped with black and free from shaftiness, black tipping or black fringe. Saddle hackle to resemble neck hackle as nearly as possible. Breast, underparts, tail coverts, wing butts and foot feather, hock feather and fluff, lustrous green black, free from grey or white. Back, shoulder coverts and wing bow black. Primaries black, free from grizzle; Secondaries – black inner webb, white outer, showing a distinct wing bay when closed.Female plumage: Head and neck silver white, each feather distinctly striped down the middle with black. Remainder silver grey, finely and evenly pencilled all over with concentric rings of dark shade, (preferably glossy green-black). The whole of uniform shade and markings with three concentric rings of pencilling or more, over as much of plumage as possible.

In both sexes and all colours Beak yellow, but in dark colours may be shaded with black or horn. Eyes red, orange or yellow-red preferred. Comb, face, wattles and ear-lobes bright red. Legs and feet yellow. (Dark legs permissible in blacks if the soles of the feet and back of shanks are yellow). 

Serious defects:Twisted or drooping comb. Slipped wings. Legs other than yellow (except for blacks). Eyes other than red, orange or yellow. Any deformity. Split front undesirable, but not a defect.

The scale of points a Pekin is judged against is as follows:


Scale of points:

Colour and markings       15


Fluff and cushion            15

Leg and foot feather       10

Size and weight              10

Type and carriage          20

Head                              10

Length of shank             10

Condition                       10

Total                           100